Interstellar

In this review I am going to attempt to spoil as little as possible about Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar, I’ve considered the ways to do this and in all honesty I think the simplest way is to avoid details of the plot entirely.  I like to think I can still give an opinion on it without ever describing it in detail.  Why?  Because there are some films that it is better to go into without any knowledge at all and because Nolan himself is well known to like it that way and who am I to argue.

Interstellar is an incredible movie.  I use that word because I don’t think anything else really encapsulates it as nicely.  It’s a movie that looks better than nearly anything I have ever seen.  Taking it’s visual cues from 2001: A Space Odyssey, everything from the ships themselves to the space they explore looks amazing and I can only say that you should see it on the biggest screen possible, in order to truly appreciate the world that Nolan has constructed.  The obvious comparison is of course last year’s Gravity and while it is arguable as to whether Interstellar manages to catch space in quite the same majestic way, there is no denying that it comes close.

Now much like Inception, it’s a movie that has seen many people focus on it’s complex nature and there is no denying that I can’t pretend to have followed all the science mumbo jumbo, I did English Literature for a reason.  However, I never felt lost because of it, sure I wasn’t entirely aware of how accurate it is, but this is science fiction; note the fiction, and accuracy doesn’t bother me.  What bothers me is a story that I can follow and relate to and even in among the high ideas, Nolan sticks to that story, the story of a man and his daughter and just what he will do to save her.  It’s one of the simplest stories there is and by making that the focal point of the film, Nolan insures that a basic knowledge of quantum physics is not required.

What makes that story work is the performances of the actors.  Matthew McConaughey is brilliant as every man pilot Cooper and he grounds the whole film.  So much has been written about his transformation as an actor and it just seems like he can no wrong at the moment.  Elsewhere, Michael Caine fills the role he fills in many Nolan films, mainly one of filling in the plot.  It’s a bit Basil Exposition at times, but Caine is still a charismatic onscreen presence and he pulls it off.  Anne Hathaway is another person who seems to be on a role at the moment and much like McConaughey she continues it here, the combination of the two of them works well and while it might have been nice to see a bit more of their relationship, the film was already nearly three hours long, so you can understand why it’s occasionally glossed over.

I genuinely loved Interstellar.  It is everything you could ask for from a blockbuster and more.  It gives you the visual treats you want, but it never forgets to be intelligent and possibly more importantly to have a soul.  People wishing to discuss the science behind it and nitpick at plot holes are welcome to, but for me that didn’t matter, because for me this was one of the best movies of the year and Nolan continues to reign supreme as the master of intelligent blockbuster cinema.

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One thought on “Interstellar

  1. Pingback: Top Ten Films of the Year: Number 10 to Number 6 | Ramblings About...

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